RPSBLAST alignment for GI: 254780290 and conserved domain: cd08288

>gnl|CDD|176248 cd08288, MDR_yhdh, Yhdh putative quinone oxidoreductases. Yhdh putative quinone oxidoreductases (QOR). QOR catalyzes the conversion of a quinone + NAD(P)H to a hydroquinone + NAD(P)+. Quinones are cyclic diones derived from aromatic compounds. Membrane bound QOR actin the respiratory chains of bacteria and mitochondria, while soluble QOR acts to protect from toxic quinones (e.g. DT-diaphorase) or as a soluble eye-lens protein in some vertebrates (e.g. zeta-crystalin). QOR reduces quinones through a semi-quinone intermediate via a NAD(P)H-dependent single electron transfer. QOR is a member of the medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase family, but lacks the zinc-binding sites of the prototypical alcohol dehydrogenases of this group. NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreductases are the major enzymes in the interconversion of alcohols and aldehydes, or ketones. Alcohol dehydrogenase in the liver converts ethanol and NAD+ to acetaldehyde and NADH, while in yeast and some other microorganisms ADH catalyzes the conversion acetaldehyde to ethanol in alcoholic fermentation. ADH is a member of the medium chain alcohol dehydrogenase family (MDR), which has a NAD(P)(H)-binding domain in a Rossmann fold of a beta-alpha form. The NAD(H)-binding region is comprised of 2 structurally similar halves, each of which contacts a mononucleotide. A GxGxxG motif after the first mononucleotide contact half allows the close contact of the coenzyme with the ADH backbone. The N-terminal catalytic domain has a distant homology to GroES. These proteins typically form dimers (typically higher plants, mammals) or tetramers (yeast, bacteria), and have 2 tightly bound zinc atoms per subunit, a catalytic zinc at the active site and a structural zinc in a lobe of the catalytic domain. NAD(H) binding occurs in the cleft between the catalytic and coenzyme-binding domains at the active site, and coenzyme binding induces a conformational closing of this cleft. Coenzyme binding typically precedes and contributes to substrate binding. In human ADH catalysis, the zinc ion helps coordinate the alcohol, followed by deprotonation of a histidine, the ribose of NAD, a serine, then the alcohol, which allows the transfer of a hydride to NAD+, creating NADH and a zinc-bound aldehyde or ketone. In yeast and some bacteria, the active site zinc binds an aldehyde, polarizing it, and leading to the reverse reaction. Length = 324
 Score = 45.6 bits (109), Expect = 2e-05
 Identities = 48/191 (25%), Positives = 85/191 (44%), Gaps = 27/191 (14%)

Query: 23  LAESPIPQPQKEEILIKVEAIGVNRPDVMQRKGLYPPPKNANPILGLEVAGKIVDLGENT 82
           L E       + ++ ++V    +N  D +   G     +    + G+++AG +V+    +
Sbjct: 17  LRELDESDLPEGDVTVEVHYSTLNYKDGLAITGKGGIVRTFPLVPGIDLAGTVVE----S 72

Query: 83  TH--WNIGDEVCALVNG--------GGYAEYCLSHQGHTLPIPKGYNAIQAASLPESFFT 132
           +   +  GD V  ++ G        GGYA+         +P+P+G +A QA ++  + FT
Sbjct: 73  SSPRFKPGDRV--VLTGWGVGERHWGGYAQRARVKADWLVPLPEGLSARQAMAIGTAGFT 130

Query: 133 VWANLFQTANLRSGQT-----VLIHGGSSGIGTTAIQLASYFGATVY-TTAKSEEKCLAC 186
             A L   A    G T     VL+ G + G+G+ A+ L +  G  V  +T + EE     
Sbjct: 131 --AMLCVMALEDHGVTPGDGPVLVTGAAGGVGSVAVALLARLGYEVVASTGRPEEA--DY 186

Query: 187 LK-LGAKHAIN 196
           L+ LGA   I+
Sbjct: 187 LRSLGASEIID 197